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Board Meeting Agenda 8-16-17

SWANTON SCHOOL BOARD MEETING SWANTON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LIBRARY

August 16, 2017 6:00 PM

6:00pm Call Meeting to Order
• Agenda Amendments

6:05pm Comments and Correspondence from the Public (Listen) • Possible Topics for Future Board Meeting Agendas

6:10pm Approval of June 12th and 20th Board Meeting Minutes (Action) 6:15pm Business Report

• Warrants 6:20pm Principal’s Report

• Hiring Update

6:30pm Superintendent’s Report
• Legislative Update

o Act49
§ 3 by 1 Option with Sheldon

o Swanton Impact from 8.4M Legislative Decrease in State Revenue • Solar Installation Update

6:45pm Old Business
• Act 46 Independent Study Committee Recommendations and Financial Impact

(attachment) 7:30pm New Business

• VSBA Regional Meeting – September 11, 5:00 PM @ Winooski School

7:35pm Future Board Meeting Dates

  • FNWSU Board Meeting – Aug. 23, 6:30 @ MVU Library
  • Swanton Elem. Board Work Session – September 27th, 6:00 PM

o 8/16, 9/27, 11/8, 12/20, 1/31, 3/14, 4/18 (longer goal planning), 6/6 (prior

to SU bd. mtg. at 5)

7:40pm Anticipated Executive Session
(Answer the Executive Session Compliance Question…Where premature public knowledge would clearly place the Board or other party at a substantial disadvantage)

7:50pm Exit Executive Session • Possible Action

8:00pm Adjournment

FY2018 School Board Goals:
Goal 1 – Increase efficient use of resources to maximize learning potential for all students

  • Continue to right-size the school staff based on enrollment changes and resource needs
  • Ensure staff and administrator performance is evaluated
  • Monitor school culture
  • Receive periodic Board updates on Marzano, Muhammad, Instructional Frame, and RTI

    implementation

    Goal 2 – Ensure challenging learning opportunities are in place for all students

  • Focus on enrichment programs
  • Promote additional science, technology, engineering, arts, and math experiences
  • Continue implementation of the NCSS Behavior Program

o Receive semi-annual reports on student bus and classroom behavior

  • Research development of an SU autism and related programs
  • Local assessment and SBAC – Board emphasis on SBAC and NECAP assessments
  • Ensure student technology skills are current
  • Increase frequency of student performance reporting at board meetings

    Goal 3 – Maintain a focus on buildings and grounds

  • Create a playground renewal plan by December
  • Continue to follow the asbestos abatement plan
  • Revisit 5 year facilities plan and prioritizing
  • Connect with Safe Routes to School and RISE-VT

    Goal 4 – Strengthen school and community communication

• Film Channel 15 video vignettes throughout the year o Integrate with other FNW schools

  • Utilize social media
  • Reach out to senior citizens (High Swans) and religious leaders
  • Host a Community Dinner in February
  • Connect with MVU Rotary Interact volunteers
  • Develop a “Get out the Vote” campaign in March
  • Engage community about pros and cons of a governance merger

    *Public Comments at Board Meetings

    The FNWSU and District School Boards are working to improve the response to public comments made at Board meetings.

    The Board reserves the right to ask visitors the following questions before they are invited to address complaints to the Board:
    Have you directed your complaint through our “Complaint” Policy i.e.:

    o Attempt to address the complaint first with teacher/staff member, and, o If not satisfied, discuss complaint with the principal, and,
    o Still not resolved, then meet with the superintendent,
    o Only then, will the Board hear your concern at a Board meeting.

    When speaking with the Board, if the complaint becomes personal, disrespectful, or threatening, then the Board chair may rule the speaker “Out of Order” or,

If the complaint addresses specific personnel or is evaluative then the Board chair may invite the complainant into executive session, and,
The Board chair may limit speaking time for each individual and ask that similar points of view from multiple speakers not be presented.

Anyone making a comment can expect a response from the Board that will fall into one of the following categories:

  • Thank the person with no further action planned.
  • Respond immediately by the Board chair or administration.
  • Direct the administration to contact and respond to the person.
  • Seek clarification from the administration at a specified meeting.
  • Add the topic to a future Board agenda.
  • Refer the matter to an executive session.
  • Hold a public hearing on the matter.
  • Send a note of appreciation.

Compliance with Vermont’s Immunization Law and Regulations

Download Original Memo below

VT Immunization Law and Regulations Compliance Memo

 

MEMORANDUM

To: Superintendents, Principals and Independent School Headmasters

From: Mark Levine, M.D., Commissioner, Department of Health Rebecca Holcombe, Ed. D., Secretary, Agency of Education

Date: June 6, 2017

Subject: Compliance with Vermont’s Immunization Law and Regulations

The importance of children being fully vaccinated has been highlighted in recent years by measles outbreaks across the country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, from January 1 to April 22, 2017, 61 people from 10 states were reported to have measles, the majority of whom were not vaccinated. In response to an increased number of students who have not received immunizations necessary for school enrollment, the Vermont General Assembly eliminated the philosophical exemption in 2015. Since then, while the number of provisionally admitted students has risen slightly, the number of nonmedical exemptions have dropped, and the total number of students, (K-12) in public and independent schools who have received all their required vaccines is at the highest rate in five years.

According to Vermont law, in order to attend a school or childcare facility, students must comply with the vaccine schedule or be provisionally admitted. All provisionally admitted students must be fully immunized within six months following enrollment, or submit a signed medical or religious exemption form. Parents of students who are not in compliance with the requirements must receive a “Notice of Missing Immunizations and Provisional Admittance” that will inform them of the steps needed to comply with the law.1 Follow up with these parents is critical. If parents do not comply by the date set, they should receive the Notice of Exclusion and Provisional Admittance.

In addition to requirements to attend school, Vermont law also requires that all schools annually report overall immunization data. This allows students and parents, teachers and administrators,

1 This letter can be found here: http://www.healthvermont.gov/sites/default/files/documents/2016/11/ID_IZ_CCP_ExclusionNotice Form.pdf

and members of the public to have access to current immunization information in their schools and schools across the state.

As the outbreaks of measles and pertussis in recent years have demonstrated, we need to work together to protect the community. Encourage parents to have their children immunized. Please let us know how the Health Department can further assist you to meet these critical health protections.

For more information and links to official forms, go to the immunization web page for school entry: http://healthvermont.gov/hc/imm/schoolentry.aspx . If you have questions, please call the Immunization Program at 802-863-7638 or 800-640-4374.

The Ticks Are Out. Here’s How to Be Tick Smart

Protect, Check, Remove, Watch

May is Tickborne Disease Awareness Month

BURLINGTON – Tick season has arrived, but the Health Department says Vermonters can enjoy being outside in our beautiful state by knowing how to avoid ticks and their bite.

Visitors to the healthvermont.gov/BeTickSmart website will find information and resources about how to avoid ticks and what to do if you find one. The department has also updated its crowd-sourced Tick Tracker, where people can share information about ticks they find around the state.

 

Reports of tickborne diseases in Vermont are up, in part, because of the greater awareness of symptoms and illness by the public and health care providers. In 2015, Vermont had the highest incidence of Lyme disease in the country. The number of reported cases of anaplasmosis quadrupled since 2012, and last year saw the first Vermont cases of a newly recognized tickborne disease caused by Borrelia miyamotoi. Health officials have also been on the watch for Powassan virus, which has been reported in surrounding states.

“Vermonters can get ill with a tickborne diseases at any time of year, but ticks are very active right now, so most people get sick in June and July,” said Bradley Tompkins, infectious disease epidemiologist at the Health Department. “Absolutely, we all should be out enjoying what Vermont has to offer – whether a walk in the woods, gardening or outdoor sports,” said Tompkins. “Just make it a priority before you go out the door to know the basic precautions for preventing tick bites.”

Health Department offers these tips to Be Tick Smart:

 Protect

  • Use an EPA-registered tick repellent on skin
  • Apply permethrin to clothing
  • Wear light-colored pants and long sleeves

Check

  • Perform daily tick checks on yourself, children and pets
  • Shower soon after spending time outdoors

Remove

  • Use tweezers to grab the tick up close to skin
  • Pull the tick straight up, do not twist
  • Wash hands and bite area with soap and water
  • Put clothing into the dryer for 10 minutes on high heat

Watch 

  • Symptoms may include fever, headache, joint pain, muscle aches, fatigue or a rash soon after a tick bite. Not all people with Lyme disease report a rash
  • Symptoms may begin as soon as three days after a tick bite, but can appear as long as 30 days after a bite
  • Contact your health care provider if you develop any of these symptoms

Go to healthvermont.gov/BeTickSmart for facts about tickborne diseases in Vermont, to see a video to learn how to safely remove a tick, and to order educational and awareness materials like booklets, cards and stickers.

The Health Department’s Tick Tracker allows people to go online and report where they encounter ticks. This crowd sourced tool provides a way to collect and share anecdotal information about where, and what kind of ticks people find. Launch the Tick Tracker at healthvermont.gov/tracking/tick-tracker.

For health news, alerts and information, visit healthvermont.gov

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